Jun 22, 2013
free-parking:

Takesada Matsutani

free-parking:

Takesada Matsutani

Mar 6, 2013
queerability:

Image is a black background with 6 rainbow stick figures, two same-gender couples and one opposite gender couple with white text: PRIDE AGAINST PREJUDICE

queerability:

Image is a black background with 6 rainbow stick figures, two same-gender couples and one opposite gender couple with white text: PRIDE AGAINST PREJUDICE

(via projectqueer)

Feb 13, 2013
Feb 13, 2013
momalibrary:

Every day at the library reference desk I look at a poster version of this chart. Ever since Alfred Barr composed it for the catalog cover of the 1936 exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art, the chart has been scrutinized, criticized, historicized, revised, and deliciously parodied.
There are so many references I’ve made an ongoing bibliography with entries from the most scholarly of deconstructions to one of my favorite riffs.
My colleagues have also been scrutinizing charts lately, sparked by the exhibition Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925. Investigating early abstraction as a global phenomenon, the curatorial team used the chart as a point of departure for visualizing contact among modern artists of the period. This in turn has opened up the general topic of visualizing art history, as seen in these ongoing entries about charts on the exhibition’s in-depth blog.
The chart fascinates me in terms of something Barr wrote in 1946, arguing for popularization

through research which makes publication effective more than that which makes it true, of what might be called the pragmatic rhetoric of education rather than its data.

The “effectiveness” of the chart lies precisely its oversimplicity. Unlike even the most erudite essay, exquisite lecture, or the landmark exhibition itself, Barr’s idea is immediately graspable (effective). In this way the chart forcefully conveys an argument—however flawed—that the art world can (and continually does) push against. -jt
Image: Alfred H. Barr, Jr. Papers, 3.C.4. The Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York. Quote: Alfred H. Barr Jr., “Research and Publication in Art Museums,” Museum News 23, no. January 1 (1946). Reprinted in Alfred H. Barr Jr., Defining Modern Art: Selected Writings of Alfred H. Barr, Jr. (New York: Abrams, 1986), 205–13.

momalibrary:

Every day at the library reference desk I look at a poster version of this chart. Ever since Alfred Barr composed it for the catalog cover of the 1936 exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art, the chart has been scrutinized, criticized, historicized, revised, and deliciously parodied.

There are so many references I’ve made an ongoing bibliography with entries from the most scholarly of deconstructions to one of my favorite riffs.

My colleagues have also been scrutinizing charts lately, sparked by the exhibition Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925. Investigating early abstraction as a global phenomenon, the curatorial team used the chart as a point of departure for visualizing contact among modern artists of the period. This in turn has opened up the general topic of visualizing art history, as seen in these ongoing entries about charts on the exhibition’s in-depth blog.

The chart fascinates me in terms of something Barr wrote in 1946, arguing for popularization

through research which makes publication effective more than that which makes it true, of what might be called the pragmatic rhetoric of education rather than its data.

The “effectiveness” of the chart lies precisely its oversimplicity. Unlike even the most erudite essay, exquisite lecture, or the landmark exhibition itself, Barr’s idea is immediately graspable (effective). In this way the chart forcefully conveys an argument—however flawed—that the art world can (and continually does) push against. -jt

Image: Alfred H. Barr, Jr. Papers, 3.C.4. The Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York. Quote: Alfred H. Barr Jr., “Research and Publication in Art Museums,” Museum News 23, no. January 1 (1946). Reprinted in Alfred H. Barr Jr., Defining Modern Art: Selected Writings of Alfred H. Barr, Jr. (New York: Abrams, 1986), 205–13.

Feb 1, 2013
Jan 23, 2013

Jan 10, 2013
I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
Maya Angelou (via paperimages)
Dec 11, 2012
Dec 7, 2012
Wall paper, by Chath pierSath

Wall paper, by Chath pierSath

Nov 12, 2012
paperimages:

Amanda Besl

paperimages:

Amanda Besl

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About
Chath pierSath is a contemporary artist working and living in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, six months of the year; the other six months, he resides and works on a family farm in Bolton, MA. Subscribe via RSS.